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GAMBLER SHOT GANGLAND STYLE IN NEWPORT


Gentlemen enjoying an evening of camaraderie and good-natured fun at the Hi-De-Ho Club.

Reprinted from The Courier-Journal

Newport, Ky., Aug. 6, 1946 (AP)

Henchmen of Albert "Red" Masterson, 43, owner of a Newport gambling house, shot last night in gangland fashion, stood guard over their wounded leader today in a Dayton, Kentucky hospital.

An order to arrest "all police characters and armed men in the city" was issued by City Manager J.B. Morlidge, following the shooting at a downtown intersection.

"It's Not Good Publicity"

Sol Youtsey, superintendent of Speers Hospital, where the wounded man drove for treatment, asserted there were no guards at Masterson's bedside. But newsmen and photographers, striving to interview Masterson, were met at the foot of a stairway leading to the men's ward by a man who told them:

"You don't want a photograph, and Masterson can't be interviewed for a few days. There's two more of us upstairs and nobody can go up. You don't want to write anything on this -- it's not good publicity."

An attendant at the hospital said she saw three men whom she identified as guards for Masterson.

Three Identified As Guards

Three men in an automobile drew alongside Masterson's car last night. There was a blast of gunfire. Masterson, wounded, leaped out and hid behind a parked car. The gangsters' car struck three parked machines before coming to a halt. The three occupants fled on foot, firing at two pedestrians who approached.

When police arrived, they searched the neighborhood and discovered Ernest "Buck" Brady, 67, owner of the building which houses the swank Latin Quarter (currently featuring Gypsy Rose Lee), hiding in an outhouse. On the strength of this, and several weapons found in the weeds nearby, Brady was arrested on a breach of peace charge.

"I am innocent," proclaimed Brady.

Later, in Newport Police Court, Brady was released on $1,000 bond and a hearing set for August 28. He explained his presence in the outhouse by saying: "When I hear shooting, I always run."